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Historic Fort Condé – The Fort of Colonial Mobile

May 26, 2017 by Corey A. Edwards

Historic Fort Condé - the Fort of Colonial Mobile You’ll feel like a time traveler when you visit Fort Condé, the Fort of Colonial Mobile, a partially reconstructed, 1724 French fort in downtown Mobile, AL!

Fort Condé stood watch over Mobile from 1723 to 1820, just three years shy of 100 years. The fort was built by the French and named after Louis Henri de Bourbon, prince of Condé  – but it didn’t keep the name long!

The English gained control of the region in 1763, changing the fort’s name to Fort Charlotte. Come 1780, the fort changes hands and name once more. Now the Spanish have control and they rename the complex, Fort Carlota. 1813 rolls around and the fort finds itself controlled by U.S. troops and once again called Fort Charlotte.

Is it any wonder, after all that, that the fort is now commonly referred to as the Fort of Colonial Mobile?

Things calmed down in the region after 1813 and, by 1823, the once mighty fort was gone: dismantled.

Zoom forward to the 1970’s and a reinterest in celebrating the colonial period of Mobile’s history. Careful excavation of the fort’s original site and a study of the building plans allows for a reconstruction of the Fort of Colonial Mobile. Of course, the reconstruction had to be a bit smaller than the original to fit in modern Mobile!

The historic Fort Condé compound took up almost 11 acres of land in what is now downtown Mobile. Reconstructing the fort to its original dimensions would have meant tearing down large sections of Royal Street, Government Boulevard, Church Street, Saint Emanuel Street, and Theatre Street!

Consequently, the reconstructed Fort of Colonial Mobile represents about one-third of the original compound, rendered in 4/5-scale. Even dramatically downsized the Fort of Colonial Mobile remains impressive and makes one wonder at how daunting a site the original Fort Condé must have been!

Visitors to the Fort of Colonial Mobile enjoy interactive exhibits, historic artifacts, and more on the peoples of early Mobile, both Native American and European. The complex includes a Colonial Cafe, Trading Post, Colonial Photo Booth, Breakout Room, and a Shooting Gallery.

Guides in period costumes help to provide a fully immersive Colonial experience.  Live exhibitions include a Fife and Drum band, a cannon firing, and actors representing historical, Colonial Mobile residents.

The Fort of Colonial Mobile will educate and entertain history buffs and casual visitors alike.

The Fort of Colonial Mobile

150 S. Royal Street, Mobile, AL
Hours – 9am to 5pm, daily. Closed most major holidays.
Be sure to visit colonialmobile.com for more details, special events, tickets, and more!

Mobile Lodging
It’s all well and good to visit Colonial times but no one wants to feel like they’re rooming there! Get the best of both old and modern worlds with a stay at Mobile’s Malaga Inn! Our boutique hotel’s 39 rooms will surpass your wildest expectations and introduce you to true comfort and relaxation. Better yet, Malaga Inn is located smack-dab in downtown Mobile, putting all of the biggest reasons to visit right at your fingertips. So what are you waiting for? Book your stay now at Malaga Inn!

Experience Colonial Times at Mobile’s Historic Fort Condé

February 12, 2016 by Corey A. Edwards

Mobile's Fort CondéStep back in time to the 18th century and America’s colonial days with a visit to Mobile, Alabama’s historic Fort Condé!

Built of brick, stone, packed earth, and cedar timbers by the French in 1723 to guard against British or Spanish attack, Fort Condé protected Mobile and its citizens for almost 100 years and under three different names!

From 1723 to 1763, the fortifications were under French rule as Fort Condé. From 1763 to 1780, England was in possession of the region, and renamed the structure Fort Charlotte. From 1780 to 1813 the battlements were known as Fort Carlota while Spain had the upper hand.

Come 1813, Mobile was occupied by US troops, and the English name for the fort – Fort Charlotte – was once again applied. Seven years later, it was determined the fort was no longer needed and, by 1823, almost all visible traces of the fort were under Mobile’s newly expanded streets: gone.

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